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Slaidburn Country Practice
 Slaidburn Country Practice
national health service

Diabetes Awareness - www.diabetes.org.uk

 

Slaidburn Patient Participation Group

  

Our aim to represent all patient voices of Slaidburn Health Centre. If you wish to join the Group or otherwise contact us, please email  Mike at mike.paula@me.com or on 01200 446861. If you wish your comment to remain anonymous please indicate this.

 

 

 

 Friends of Slaidburn Country Practice

 

The Friends of Slaidburn Country Practice are a valued group of local people who advise and support us.They raise money to purchase new equipment ensuring that we are able to provide services and treatments using the most  up to date and modern equipment. Over the years they have raised thousands of pounds to provide us with defibrillators, comfortable seating for the waiting room, treatment room equipment including hydraulic chair/couch. They also act as a representative voice of the patients in helping to shape our services.

They meet quarterly at the Health Centre with the AGM held in October of each year.

If you are interested in becoming a 'Friend of Slaidburn Country Practice' please contact Mrs D Pearson - Chairman - 01200 446169

 

Committee

Slaidburn   
Mrs D Pearson (Chairman)   01200 446169 
Mrs J Lawson (treasurer)  
Mrs G Raw   
   
Bolton by Bowland   
Mrs J Lilburn  
Mrs A Pickard  
   
   
Newton in Bowland   
Mrs A Grimes (Secretary)  
Mrs J Schofield   
Mrs E Thornber  
   
Dunsop Bridge   
Mrs J Carr  
 

 

Chatburn and Grindleton   
Mrs J Smalley   
   
Tosside   
Miss I Parsons   

 

 

Slaidburn Country Practice

Patient Participation Group Report 2013-14

 

Slaidburn Country Practice is a small, single-handed rural practice with patients spread across the Hodder Valley and indeed has one of the largest catchment areas in the country. Taking this into consideration the Patient Participation Group (PPG) or Friends of Slaidburn Country Practice seeks membership from each of the main villages in the area as it is felt that this is the best way to represent the practice population and indeed the membership reflects this. The membership of the Friends is very representative in that it is spread across the area with patients from all the main village localities.

The practice population has almost equal numbers of men and women with almost half the population over 50 years of age. Around 15% of patients are over 70 years of age whilst the same percentage is aged between 20 and 40. The practice population does not contain any large specific care group, with the numbers of patients in nursing homes, with learning disabilities and drug users all in single figures. Registered carers are small in number but the practice is actively seeking to identify these. In terms of ethnicity the practice population is almost totally white British.

The membership of the Friends is not ideally representative in terms of age or gender grouping even though we have actively encouraged younger people and men to join. At present the Friends has more women members than men and in general comprises members over 50 years of age.

Membership of the group continues to be actively promoted on notice boards within the Health Centre and in the regular News from the Surgery articles printed in the local Villager magazine. Several carers have been approached individually and asked to join the patient participation group and the group has been promoted at WI and Toddler groups.

During the year Slaidburn Country Practice has held regular meetings of both a Stategy and Implemention Group comprising patients who were campaigning to help prevent the practice from closing due to the withdrawal of the MPIG funding. This has generated interest in the Friends of Slaidburn Country Practice.

 

A meeting was held with the PPG, The Friends of Slaidburn Country Practice on Wednesday 12th February 2014. The questions to be used in a questionnaire were discussed. After discussion with the Patient Participation Group it was decided to use the same questionnaire as last year based on the GPAQ Version 3 Questionnaire as this included all the questions prioritised and enabled comparison with last year’s questionnaire.

The areas included in the Patient Survey were regarding:the receptionists and appointments, seeing the doctor, opening hours, car parking, ability of doctor, ability of nurse and patient care.Patient comments were also asked for.

 

A poster was produced explaining the survey and this was displayed in the surgery. A box was placed in the surgery into which completed questionnaires could be returned confidentially. 60 copies of the questionnaires were made.

Beginning on 25th February 2014 all patients who attended the surgery (except temporary residents and patients under 16 years of age) were given a questionnaire to complete. If they could not complete the questionnaire whilst in the surgery, they were given a stamped addresses envelope to return the questionnaire to the surgery once completed. This process was continued over the following week. 57 questionnaires were returned.

The results of the questionnaire were summarised together with the results of the 2013 questionnaire.

A meeting was held at the Health Centre on 11th March 2014 with representatives of the PPG to discuss the questionnaire results.

The PPG was happy with the way the questionnaire had been run. They felt it was more appropriate to run a written survey to be handed out in the surgery rather than a telephone or email questionnaire.

The sections of the questionnaire were then looked at in more detail.

The section about receptionists and making appointments had again scored highly. It was noted that the number of patients who would like to be able to book online had doubled from 7 to 15. The practice is to look into Emis Access in the next year to enable online booking of some appointments directly. The length of time patients have to wait for consultations to start has improved slightly. Patients mostly rated this as excellent.

The number of patients who would like to see a male doctor has remained the same. This may be possible when the practice federates with ELMS as other GPs may be working at the practice.

Similar numbers of patients would like to see extended hours such as Saturdays. At present while the practice is single handed this is not feasible.

The sections about the doctor and nurse, both received excellent scores with responses being predominantly excellent. All of the patients answered yes to the question did they have confidence in the doctor or nurse they saw. The practice again scored highly (with mainly scores of very well) on the questions about the practice’s ability to help patients understand and cope with their health problem and to help patients keep themselves healthy. 90% described their experience at the GP’s as excellent and the remaining 10 % rated it as very good. All patients said they would either yes definitely or yes probably recommend the GP Surgery to someone moving to the local area.

 

The PPG felt the results were once again excellent and that the comments recorded showed how much patients value the service they receive at Slaidburn. They thought patients appreciated the fact that they could be seen quickly and never had to wait long for an appointment.

The future structure of the PPG was discussed as it was felt the group would benefit from a broader mix of patients. This will be looked at, at the AGM in September.

The action plan formulated following the meeting to discuss the survey was that the practice strive to continue to provide services to as high a standard as possible and monitor this with further audit and that the Friends continue to provide advice and promote participation.

As it was felt the group would benefit from a broader mix of patients it was decided to continue to promote the group whenever and wherever possible; at the Health Centre, in the practice’s regular contribution to the local Villager magazine, at local groups such as Playgroup and target individuals such as Carers. The future structure will be looked at again at the AGM in September.The practice is to look into Emis Access in the next year to enable online booking of some appointments directly.

The hours of opening of Slaidburn Health Centre continue to be 8.00am to 5.00pm Monday to Friday with telephone access to services 8.00am to 6.30pm on the same days. Extended access is considered regularly but at present the majority of patients are satisfied with practice opening hours and an increase in hours is difficult as a single-handed practice.

 

 

 

Patient survey from Slaidburn Country Practice,

using the General Practice Assessment Questionnaire (GPAQ) for 2013-14

 

How the survey was carried out

 

A meeting was held with the Patient Participation Group, The Friends of Slaidburn Country Practice on Wednesday 12th February 2014. The questions to be used in the questionnaire were discussed. After discussion with the Patient Participation Group it was decided to use the same questionnaire as last year based on the GPAQ Version 3 Questionnaire.

A poster was produced explaining the survey and this was displayed in the surgery. A box was placed in the surgery into which completed questionnaires could be returned confidentially. 60 copies of the questionnaires were made.

Beginning on 25th February 2014 all patients who attended the surgery (except temporary residents and patients under 16 years of age) were given a questionnaire to complete. If they could not complete the questionnaire whilst in the surgery, they were given a stamped addresses envelope to return the questionnaire to the surgery once completed. This process was continued over the following week. 57 questionnaires were returned.

The results of the questionnaire were summarised and transferred into this report.

 

GPAQ report questions

 

Some GPAQ questions ask about specific experiences, or ask the patient for specific information. The responses to these questions are summarised here. The figures shown in brackets are the figures for the 2012-13 questionnaire for comparision.

 

The following questions were about the receptionists and appointments.

 

How helpful do you find the receptionists at your GP practice?

 

55   (57)

Very helpful

1     (4)

Fairly helpful

 

Not very helpful

 

Not at all helpful

 

Don’t know

 

How easy is it to get through to someone at your GP practice on the phone?

 

55   (51)

Very easy

1     (11)

Fairly easy

 

Not very easy

 

Not at all easy

 

Don’t know

 

Haven’t tried

 

How easy is it to speak to a doctor or nurse on the phone at your GP practice?

 

32   (28)

Very easy

15   (14)

Fairly easy

1

Not very easy

       (1)

Not at all easy

1     (1)

Don’t know

7     (18)

Haven’t tried

 

If you need to see a GP urgently, can you normally get seen on the same day?

 

47   (53)

Yes

1     (1)

No

8     (7)

Don’t know/never needed to know

How important is it to you to be able to book appointments ahead of time in your practice?

 

48   (49)

Important

8     (12)

Not important

 

How easy is it to book ahead in your practice?

 

49   (53)

Very easy

4     (6)

Fairly easy

 

Not very easy

 

Not at all easy

 

Don’t know

3     (3)

Haven’t tried

 

How do you normally book your appointments at your practice? Patients were asked to tick all the boxes that apply.

 

16   (11)

In person

50   (61)

By phone

 

Doesn’t apply

 

Which of the following methods would you prefer to use to book appointments at your practice? Patients were asked to tick all the boxes that apply.

 

16   (12)

In person

51   (59)

By phone

15   (7)

Online

2     (2)

Doesn’t apply

 

The following questions refer to when the patient wanted to see the doctor. 

 

How quickly do you usually get seen?

 

50   (50)

Same day or next day

       (6)

2 – 4 days

1

5 days or more

1     (2)

I don’t usually need to be seen quickly

      (3)

Don’t know, never tried

 

How do you rate this?

 

49   (42)

Excellent

4     (15)

Very good

       (1)

Good

 

Fair

 

Poor

 

Very poor

       (3)

Does not apply

 

How long did you wait for your consultation to start after your appointment time?

 

30   (25)

Less than 5 minutes

22   (30)

5 -10 minutes

       (3)

11 – 20 minutes

 

21 – 30 minutes

 

More than 30 minutes

1      (1)

There was no set time for my consultation

 

How do you rate this?

 

41   (29)

Excellent

9     (25)

Very good

2     (4)

Good

 

Fair

 

Poor

 

Very poor

1      (1)

Does not apply

 

If a male doctor was available half a day a month, would you prefer to use this clinic?

 

6     (3)

Yes, definitely

5     (9)

Yes, probably

15   (28)

No, probably not

5     (3)

No, Definitely not

18   (14)

Don’t know

 

The following questions are about opening hours

 

Is the practice open at times that are convenient to you?

 

46   (58)

Yes 

5     (2)

No

1

Don’t know

 

Which of the following additional opening hours would make it easier for you to see or speak to someone? Patients were asked to tick all the boxes that apply.

 

7     (8)

Before 8.00am

6     (2)

At lunchtime

10   (10)

After 6.30pm

14   (16)

On a Saturday

3     (1)

On a Sunday

12   (15)

None of these

 

How do you find car parking at the Health Centre?

 

13    (8)

Very easy

29    (32)

Fairly easy

7     (16)

Not very easy

2     (2)

Not at all easy

 

Don’t know

1      (2)

Haven’t tried

 

The following questions are about how good the doctor was the last time the patient saw them. If patients hadn’t seen a doctor in the last 6 months they were asked to skip to the questions about seeing the nurse.

 

Giving you enough time

 

40   (47)

Very good

9     (6)

Good

1     (2)

Fair

 

Poor

 

Very poor

       (1)

Does not apply

 

Listening to you

 

42   (48)

Very good

9     (6)

Good

       (2)

Fair

       (1)

Poor

 

Very poor

       (1)

Does not apply

 

Explaining tests and treatments

 

40   (40)

Very good

11   (12)

Good

       (4)

Fair

 

Poor

 

Very poor

       (2)

Does not apply

 

Involving you in decisions about your care

 

38   (43)

Very good

11    (9)

Good

       (2)

Fair

 

Poor

 

Very poor

2     (4)

Does not apply

 

Treating you with care and concern

 

40   (45)

Very good

11   (8)

Good

       (3)

Fair

 

Poor

 

Very poor

       (2)

Does not apply

 

Did you have confidence and trust in the doctor you saw or spoke to?

 

44   (48)

Yes definitely

7     (8)

Yes, to some extent

 

No, not at all   

       (2)

Don’t know/can’t say

 

The following questions are about how good the nurse was the last time the patient saw them. If patients hadn’t seen a nurse in the last 6 months they were asked to skip to the demographic questions.

 

Giving you enough time

 

42   (49)

Very good

6     (6)

Good

       (1)

Fair

 

Poor

 

Very poor

 

Does not apply

 

Listening to you

 

43   (46)

Very good

5     (9)

Good

       (1)

Fair

 

Poor

 

Very poor

 

Does not apply

 

Explaining tests and treatments

 

43   (50)

Very good

5     (4)

Good

       (1)

Fair

 

Poor

 

Very poor

       (1)

Does not apply

 

Involving you in decisions about your care

 

41   (34)

Very good

7     (14)

Good

       (1)

Fair

 

Poor

 

Very poor

       (3)

Does not apply

 

 

Treating you with care and concern

 

40   (43)

Very good

8     (9)

Good

       (1)

Fair

 

Poor

 

Very poor

       (1)

Does not apply

 

Did you have confidence and trust in the nurse you saw or spoke to?

 

45   (50)

Yes definitely

3     (3)

Yes, to some extent

       (1)

No, not at all

 

Don’t know/can’t say

 

The following questions refer to the care patients get from doctors and nurses. The questions  

 

How well does the practice help you to understand your health problems?

 

45   (56)

Very well

4     (2)

Unsure

 

Not very well

3     (2)

Does not apply

 

How well does the practice help you to cope with your health problems?

 

47   (54)

Very well

2     (2)

Unsure

 

Not very well

3     (4)

Does not apply

 

How well does the practice help you to keep yourself healthy?

 

46   (49)

Very well

3     (5)

Unsure

       (1)

Not very well

3     (3)

Does not apply

 

 

Overall, how would you describe your experience of your GP surgery?

 

47   (37)

Excellent

5     (20)

Very good

       (2)

Good

 

Fair

 

Poor

 

Very poor

 

Would you recommend your GP surgery to someone who has just moved to your local area?

 

47   (55)

Yes, definitely

5     (6)

Yes, probably

 

No, probably not

 

No, Definitely not

 

Don’t know

 

 

At the end of the questionnaire patients were asked to make additional comments if they wished. The following comments were recorded:-

  • The staff at Slaidburn Health Centre are unfailingly helpful & courteous. Never rush the patients.
  • Excellent service, excellent staff, they go above and beyond the call of duty. Always very helpful, kind and confidential.
  • I think this doctor is absolutely marvelous and the practice nurse and all the staff.
  • I strongly hope that the facility is allowed to continue as it provides an essential service to the local community.
  • This surgery should be top of any lists for remaining open! It makes no sense to close such an excellent health centre. It should be used as an example of how to operate a surgery.
  • Very friendly and helpful. I’ve never had an unpleasant experience.
  • Jo the nurse is excellent. I have a needle phobia and she is very understanding and relaxing. Thank you. Slaidburn Health Centre is wonderful, even though I have lived in Clitheroe for years, I still return here as the service and care is second to none. They are reliable, friendly and supportive. Having been a patient here since 1999, I would never wish to leave.
  • I’m glad that you are to remain open.
  • I think it very important that Slaidburn continues to have a GP practice for the health and welfare of the village and its environs.
  • An excellent surgery. Never have issues getting appointments, always dealt with very well in a friendly manner. Wouldn’t change surgeries as locally would get a much poorer service and become a statistic.
  • We have an excellent practice here and are very pleased to be long term patients. This surely is a model for the care and attention to patients for all practices to follow.
  • I moved up into the Slaidburn Area last July and can honestly say the doctor and staff have been excellent. Best practice I have been to. Thank you.
  • Brilliant
  • The quality of service and treatment is second to none. We in Slaidburn are so privileged to have such a fine surgery with such dedicated staff who always smile. How dare anyone take this “gift” away from us. Please NHS get your act together.

Demographics - The following tables display the demographic data collected in GPAQ.

Are you?

 

20   (30)

Male

31   (31)

Female

 

How old are you?

 

 

Under 16

14   (16)

16 to 44

19   (18)

45 to 64

14   (15)

65 to 74

5     (12)

75 or over

 

Do you have a long-standing health condition?

 

28   (32)

Yes

23   (21)

No

1     (7)

Don’t know/can’t say

 

What is your ethnic group?

 

55   (60)

White

 

Black or Black British

 

Asian or Asian British

 

Mixed

 

Chinese

 

Other ethnic group

 

Which of the following best describes you?

 

32   (28)

Employed (full or part time, including self-employed)

 

Unemployed/looking for work

       (2)

At school or in full time education

1     (4)

Unable to work due to long term sickness

4     (3)

Looking after your home/ family

16   (22)

Retired from paid work

      (1)

Other

 

Appendix 1

 

Notes about how the General Practice Assessment Questionnaire (GPAQ) was developed

 

Some aspects of quality are best assessed by asking patients. We reviewed the literature to identify aspects of GP care which are most highly valued by patients. These include:

 

Availability and accessibility, including: availability of appointments, waiting times, physical access and telephone access.

 

Technical competence, including: the doctor’s knowledge and skills, and the effectiveness of his or her treatments. 

 

Communication skills, including: providing time, exploring patients’ needs, listening, explaining, giving information and sharing decisions.

 

Inter-personal attributes, including: humaneness, caring, supporting and trust.

 

Organisation of care, including: continuity of care, and, the range of services available.

 

In order to assess these aspects of care we started from what we regarded as the best currently available questionnaire, the Primary Care Assessment Survey (PCAS) [i], [ii], [iii], [iv], which had been extensively validated in the United States. In collaboration with the Health Institute in Boston, we modified PCAS for use in British general practice. The modified questionnaire was called the General Practice Assessment Survey (GPAS). We have used GPAS in large studies in the UK: and detailed research data on GPAS have been published [v] [vi] [vii] [viii] [ix].

 

For the new GP contract, we were asked to modify our original GPAS questionnaire, and have produced GPAQ. The main differences are that the new questionnaire is shorter. We have also produced two versions, one designed to be sent by post, and one designed to be given to patients after consultations in the surgery.  

 

GPAQ focuses mainly on questions about access, inter-personal aspects of care, and continuity of care. The version designed to be completed after the consultation asks about are given by an individual doctor. These scores will be able to be used by GPs for their appraisals and revalidation folders. The postal version of GPAQ does not allow scores to be calculated for individual doctors. However, it does include questions about the practice nurses.

 

GPAQ is described in more detail in the manual which can be downloaded from the GPAQ website, www.gpaq.info.

 


Appendix 2

 

Guidance on how to use the results of the questionnaire to improve care in your practice – taking action on GPAQ scores 

 

There is little purpose in doing a survey unless you are prepared to act on the results. In this section, we discuss briefly how you might do this.

 

GPAQ has been designed so that it is as easy as possible to know how you can use your scores to improve care in your practice. All the questions can be linked directly to some action which you could take. For example, in the communication questions, we have included questions on listening and explaining rather than important but rather nebulous concepts like trust. So for every question in GPAQ, there is some behaviour which you could think about improving.

 

Some of the work of deciding how to use the results can be done with the practice staff. So, for example, some of the access questions throw up issues which can be addressed through the practice management – e.g. managing the appointment system, phone answering, etc. The access questions form the largest single group of questions.

 

The next largest group is about communication. This is more difficult to address, but there are well tested methods of improving doctors’ communication skills in consultations. These generally rely on critical analysis of videotaped surgeries, usually with a partner or friendly mentor. This is something which all training practices will have had experience of in recent years, as consultation skills training forms an important part of vocational training.

 

In thinking about who to discuss your survey results with, you should think about:

 

  • Your partners and other doctors working in the practice
  • Nurses working in the practice
  • Your practice managers and receptionist / admin staff.

 

Some issues, e.g. scores on the access scale, will need to be discussed with all your staff.

 

We are aware that most practices have little experience of how to use questionnaires to help them improve care. So, the National Primary Care Research and Development Centre, with the University of Exeter and CFEP have written a practical handbook on this subject. This handbook is freely available to download from NPCRDC’s website (http://www.npcrdc.man.ac.uk/PublicationDetail.cfm?ID=111).

 

References



[i] Gelb Safran D et al. The Primary Care Assessment Survey. Tests of data quality and measurement performance.  Medical Care 1998; 36: 728-39

 

[ii] Gelb Safran D et al. Linking primary care performance to outcomes of care. Journal of Family Practice 1998; 47: 213-220.

 

[iii] Murray A, Gelb Safran D. The Primary Care Assessment Survey: a tool for measuring, monitoring and improving primary care. In: Maruish M (ed) Handbook of Psychological Assessment in Primary Care Settings. 1999. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

 

[iv] Taira DA et al. Asian American patient ratings of physician primary care performance. Journal of General Internal Medicine 1997; 12: 237-242

 

[v] Ramsay J, Campbell J, Schroter S, Green J, Roland M. The General Practice Assessment Survey (GPAS): tests of data quality and measurement properties. Family Practice 2000; 17: 372-379

 

[vi] Campbell JL, Ramsay J, Green J. Age, gender, socioeconomic, and ethnic differences in patients' assessments of primary health care. Qual Health Care. 2001 Jun;10(2):90-5

 

[vii] Bower P, Mead N, Roland M.What dimensions underlie patient responses to the General Practice Assessment Survey? A factor analytic study.Fam Pract. 2002 Oct;19(5):489-95.

 

[viii] Bower P, Roland M, Campbell J, Mead N. Setting standards based on patients’ views on access and continuity: secondary analysis of data from the general practice assessment survey. British Medical Journal 2003; 236: 258-60.

 

[ix] Bower P, Roland MO. Bias in patient assessments on general practice: General Practice Assessment Survey scores in surgery and postal responders. British Journal of General Practice 2003; 53: 126-128.

 

 

 

 

 

 


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